How to Tell a Story with Your Resume

 A great resume should read like a story, not a rap sheet.

A great resume should read like a story, not a rap sheet.

Not long ago I had lunch with a former TV reporter who was ready for a career change and wanted me to review his resume. I agreed. But when the resume arrived in my inbox a few days later, I was taken aback. What he sent looked more like a rap sheet than a resume and certainly wasn’t an argument for his success in a new role.

How could someone who had spent a career poetically telling the stories of others come up so short in telling his own? Happens all the time.

All journalists know their job involves more than just cataloging the facts. They must weave them into a relevant, compelling and accurate narrative. Yet, when it comes to telling their own tale, they---like all of us---often revert to a data dump. Every location, title, date and award is recorded. What’s missing is good information about how those previous jobs have prepared them for the next.

Journalists and all resume writers should ask themselves  “What’s the storyline that shows my future employer I’m a great candidate for this job?”

Here are a few ways to use storytelling to improve your resume:

Summarize your storyline. Briefly stating an objective is an excellent way to connect what you’ve done and what you want to do next, particularly if you’re changing careers and it’s not obvious. For example: “Veteran salesman seeks to apply competitive spirit, passion for science, and 25 years success in automotive to new role in pharmaceutical sales.” Just keep it short and steer clear of meaningless clichés like “proven track record,” “results-driven” and “demonstrated success” that typically signal the opposite of what they intend.

Paint a picture. Take the hiring manager’s view and think, “In what way does this person fit our company, our culture and our challenges?” Then accentuate experiences and skills that align with what your new employer needs and let go of some of the others. If you focus too much on the details that don’t apply to the next job, you’ll look like that’s all you can do or want to do.

Use slow mo and fast forward: Movie directors do it all the time: They draw out every detail of a key scene, then compress years or even decades that are less important. When writing your resume, the “real estate” you allot your experiences need not be proportional to the years you spent toiling at them. So long as you don’t distort the truth, it’s OK to elaborate on the few projects that most pertain to your next job while glossing over the time consuming tasks–or entire jobs–that don’t.

Bottom line: Apply a few simple storytelling techniques to your resume and interview process and your job search just might have a happy ending.

Give it a try and let us know if it works for you or what else has worked better. For more great ideas and tips for rock solid communication, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @bluestoneexec.

10 Tips for a Great Speech at the Holiday Party

Editor's note: Year after year, this is our most popular post. We're happy to bring it back for a holiday encore. Cheers!

Ah, the office holiday party. It conjures punchlines of poor wardrobe choices and over-served sales reps. But in reality, it's one of the more dignified traditions to survive the modern work world. 

And for bosses, it's a moment that calls for reminding everyone why they're drinking (or at least eating) on the company tab. Rather than viewing this speech as an obligation, bosses should embrace it as an opportunity to set the tone for the coming year with remarks that make the team feel both appreciated and appreciative.

Here are 10 tips for giving a great holiday speech.

  1. Thank them. It's the whole point of the speech and, frankly, the party. If you do nothing else, be sure to thank your team for hard work throughout the year.
  2. Thank the significant others. They've made sacrifices on behalf of your company as well, carrying the load on the home front when the employee travels, works late or misses a teacher conference. And no one more influences your employee's decisions whether it's to stay at the company, volunteer for big projects or gripe about the health plan. Here is a chance to bank some goodwill with the spouses.
  3. Mention milestones. Now's also the time to remind employees of what it means to work for a great company. So mention the firm's important milestones whether it's doubling sales or just staying afloat in a terrible economy. But mention some personal milestones too, like new home purchases, engagements, weddings, births and graduations. Helping employees make the connection between a great job and a high quality of life is worthwhile.
  4. Get specific. If your team is small, mention each one along with something memorable about their year. If the team is large, you may still want to call on a few stand outs----and not just the high billers. Some "fan favorites" might be worthy of a mention too, like the IT staffer who doubled download speed or the admin who engineered the office move.
  5. Highlight successes, say nothing of setbacks. This isn't a company meeting. It's a party.
  6. Be brief. Remember, for them the night is about the party, not the speech.
  7. Rehearse. You might think you can wing it, but you're wrong. Take time to draft remarks and rehearse them----aloud and at least three times.
  8. Don't chicken out. In a weak moment you might think a party doesn't require a speech and opt just to skip it. But don't. There is a reason why companies hold holiday parties, but employees won't think about it unless you tell them.
  9. Speak early. Wait until everyone arrives and has had a drink, but not much longer. You want folks sober and focused on you and after more than an hour or so most won't be either.
  10. Save the cocktails for after. You may think you need a drink to calm your nerves, but you'll be better off without it. Instead, sip a soda until it's go-time, then knock 'em dead. You can bask in the glow of a great speech (and a good stiff drink) the rest of the night.

Give it a try and let us know how it works or what else might work better. For more great ideas and tips for rock solid communication, check out our blog "Let's Be Clear,"visit bluestoneexec.com, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @bluestoneexec.

 

Facing Your Own PR Crisis? Better Get Your Story Straight

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Good public relations practices are scalable. The same strategies that can help a global company navigate an epic crisis can hold true for individuals fighting to manage their own bad news---like an untimely departure.

None of us likes to think about losing a job. But if the day comes when you find yourself packing that cardboard box, here are three PR moves to help keep your image in tact while you regroup.

Get your story straight. Sure, you’ll want to vent to your personal inner circle. But before you share the bad news much further, come up with a narrative about what happened and what you want to see happen next.

Regardless of the reason for the separation, you should be able to frame it in terms that highlight your professionalism. Most importantly, you want to draw a picture in which the listener can see you moving on to even better things.

No matter the circumstances, resist the urge to paint yourself as a victim, even if you are one. People feel sorry for victims, but they don’t hire them. Instead summarize the situation and emphasize what YOU are doing to take control of your future.

Get Some Good Buzz Going. Once you have your story straight, start spreading it. Reach out to as many people in your network and their networks as you can---and not just people in positions of power. In fact, while people high up the food chain can be very valuable at helping to close a deal, they are not as useful at the front end of a job search when you need to dig up leads. Make the rounds electronically or better yet in person. Ask for informational interviews to learn about new companies and get the momentum going. All along the way, let folks know you’re interested in new opportunities and would appreciate them keeping their ear to the ground for you. You’ll be surprised by who in your circle turns out to be helpful.

Malign No One. Talking ill of someone else only calls into question your character, not theirs. So take the high road when it comes to speaking about your former company, supervisor and colleagues. If you can’t say something nice about them, focus instead on the opportunities you were given to grow and do good work. You’ll win points for graciousness and professionalism---and you’ll be that much closer to your next great thing.

Give it a try and let us know if it works for you or what else has worked better. For more great ideas and tips for rock solid communication, visit bluestoneexec.com, like us on Facebook or follow us on Twitter @bluestoneexec.


What Would Dylan Do? Alternatives to PowerPoint

What Would Dylan Do? Alternatives to PowerPoint

A few months ago I attended a professional event at which I knew a well-respected and charismatic CEO would be speaking. Sure enough, he started things off with the stage presence of a stand up comedian and quickly had us all laughing and leaning in.

But then it started: The dreaded PowerPoint presentation.

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